guardian
guardian:

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate writer, dies aged 87
The Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who unleashed the worldwide boom in Spanish literature with his novel 100 Years of Solitude, has died at the age of 87, a person close to the family has said. García Márquez had been admitted to hospital in Mexico City on 3 April with pneumonia. Full story
Pictured: Gabriel García Márquez at his house in Mexico City, 2010. Photograph: Miguel Tovar/AP

guardian:

Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate writer, dies aged 87

The Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who unleashed the worldwide boom in Spanish literature with his novel 100 Years of Solitude, has died at the age of 87, a person close to the family has said. García Márquez had been admitted to hospital in Mexico City on 3 April with pneumonia. Full story

Pictured: Gabriel García Márquez at his house in Mexico City, 2010. Photograph: Miguel Tovar/AP

policymic

In Denmark, studying pays off. Encouraging its citizens to finish secondary school, the country pays its students to go to school. Danes between the ages of 18 and 20 are eligible for a monthly grant (yes, it doesn’t have to be paid back) to finish high school. 

Students 18 or 19 years old who are living at home receive approximately $465 per month to keep learning. If they’re not living at home, they can receive up to $1,078 dollars per month. How’s that for a cure to senior-itis? Those 20 years or older, could also receive similar-sized grants to complete high school. 

Read moreFollow policymic

plannedparenthood

wheres-margo:

Singer uses her music video to intriguingly show how fake performers are in videos

Hungarian musician Boggie sits still and sings for her latest music video… So what makes it interesting?

As she performs, her video editor retouches her skin, hair, facial features, and lighting during the song so that by the end everything looks “right”…

(This is actually really cool: Source)

tankertalk

tankertalk:

image

It’s a global health fad with millions of fans in Europe and the United States, and yet in Greece, many people have never heard of ‘Greek yoghurt’.

Equally surprising in an age when billions are spent on marketing, the term ‘Greek yoghurt’ is basically a quirk of fate.

"What is known abroad…

tedx

tedx:

Rats on patrol — rodents that detect landmines and tuberculosis

As a kid, Bart Weetjens was rather fond of his pet rats. Where other people saw mangy rodents, he saw potential. These oft-feared mammals can be more than just subway chasers and gourmet French chefs (Ratatouille, anyone?): in fact, rats can save lives.

Weetjens grew up to help establish APOPO, an NGO that employs African Giant Pouched Rats to detect landmines and tuberculosis. Using these rats is an affordable, inventive solution to blights that plague some of the world’s poorest countries.

Rats have more genetic material allocated to smell than any other mammal on earth. Weetjens trains them to scratch at a surface when they discover a particular smell, such as explosive materials or TB-positive sputum samples. Turns out, they’re much more effective than standard detection technologies. In standard landmine detection, four people with metal detectors can clear about 200 square meters of land every day. A rat with one trainer can clear the same amount of land in only half an hour.

They’re impressively good at screening for tuberculosis as well. A lab technician can correctly identify about 50 percent of TB-positive samples with a microscope, but adding a rat to that process bumps up the rate to 67 percent or more. Plus, they’ll work for peanuts and stay focused for hours at a time.

See how Weetjens came up with this innovation, and see his rats in action in his talk from TEDxBratislava below:

ted

ted:

Each of these plants is over 2,000 years old. 

Rachel Sussman is on a quest to celebrate the resilience of life by identifying and photographing the world’s oldest continuous-living organisms. The plants you see above, from top to bottom:

1. Jomon Sugi, Japanese Cedar (2,180 to 7,000 years old, Yaku Shima, Japan)

2. Clonal Mojave Yucca (12,000+ years old, Mojave Desert, California)

3. La Llareta (3,000 years old, Atacama Desert, Chile) 

4. Pando, Clonal Quaking Aspen (80,000 years old, Fish Lake, Utah)

5. Welwitschia Mirabilis (2,000 years old, Namib Naukluft Desert, Namibia)

6. Sagole Baobab (2,000 years  old, Limpopo Province, South Africa)

7. Spruce Gran Picea (9,550 years old, Fulufjället, Sweden)

Watch her talk here »